Study of 52000 men uncovers the genetics underlying male pattern baldness

While it is lifting that scientists were able to identify the genes responsible for baldness or hair loss in men, WebMD wrote. The X chromosome was the main culprit behind male pattern baldness.

The team studied the DNA from more than 52,000 mostly middle-aged men taking part in a enormous British genetic experiment called BioBank.

Although common, male baldness can have negative psychological effects and some studies have even linked it to a handful of serious illnesses. Almost 40% of men will go bald which makes us the fifth highest count of smooth-headed men per capita.

Hair loss can be concerning for both men and women and while stress has been attributed as one of the contributing factors, a new research suggests that the clue could lie in our genetic makeup. The rest were scattered across the genome. According to the study, for instance, there is "a degree of overlap" between hair and height, with balder men tending toward a shorter stature.




This happens to be the largest study regarding male pattern baldness. Another 12,000 had slight hair loss; 14,000 had moderate hair loss and 9,800 had severe hair loss.

Previously, a few genes had been identified regarding baldness. Only 14 percent in this group were bald and 39 percent hadn't lost any hair at all. It's still "some way off" but the results can help to identify which men that are at a greater risk of losing their hair.

Avoid Constant heating & drying: Do not open up hair to too much heating and drying techniques since this process is said to lessen hair proteins which will ultimately weaken the hair giving it fragility.

The study's principal investigator, Dr Riccardo Marioni, from the University of Edinburgh, said: "We are still a long way from making an accurate prediction for an individual's hair loss pattern". One of the genes on the X chromosome - the gene for the androgen receptor, which binds to the hormone testosterone - was strongly linked with severe hair loss. "Male pattern baldness affects around 80 percent of men by the age of 80 years", the researchers wrote. The real cause of hair loss is still unclear, but United Kingdom scientists might be one step closer to understanding why it's so prevalent.

 
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